‘Volatility Volcano’ Erupts…

Changes in the real Fed funds rate have historically led realised equity volatility by about two years, due to the lags between official rate moves and risk-taking (the Fed started hiking in December 2015, albeit at a glacial pace). Low realized volatility feeding into quant based theoretical models has always fuelled the intellectual hubris of finance PhDs (think LTCM etc.) and ultimately proved toxic. The pre-crisis period shows that misplaced correlation assumptions can lead to a far more benign assessment of overall asset risk than is prudent.’  Weekly Insight ‘Sitting on the Volatility Volcano…’ Oct 12th 2017

‘That issue of deteriorating market depth and the proliferation of highly correlated factor based strategies which are de facto short volatility/long equity beta (including long duration corporate credit as an equity proxy) will become a big story next year…the value at risk models are in this sustained low realized volatility environment at maximum exposure to (particularly US) equities. A shock to consensus positioning, be it from inflation, policy or politics could see an ‘air pocket’ liquidity event. Overall, it looks wise to look for ways to trade against to trade the prevailing bias that growth, inflation and interest rates are anchored permanently lower.’ Weekly Insight, 18th December 2017

Our view coming into 2017 was that market structure rather than macro was the biggest risk and to prepare for both higher rates and volatility. That meant underweighting rate duration, being long equity reflation winners and finding volatility hedges. The importance of this selloff is to signal a shift to more nuanced risk appetite after the simplistic ‘melt up’ hype. As highlighted in those Q4 notes referencing the ominous LTCM precedent, the quant/factor investing boom was vulnerable to a paradigm shift in its input variables. While the financial engineers tinkering with factor models suffer a reality check, it’s unlikely that the multi-year bull market is over with earnings growth momentum still accelerating in many markets. Most systematic momentum following funds which soared in January are now down YTD, but given limited leverage overall, this doesn’t look a systemic event like LTCM threatened to become.

However, the role of ultra-low interest rates as a discounting mechanism and low realised volatility as a driver of equity appetite for factor-based strategies such as risk parity has belatedly come into focus for the consensus. If Q1 16 was about investors stress testing portfolios for deflation risks, this time the adjustment is to a higher risk-free discount rate; the 2-year bond overtaking the S&P dividend yield last month was a cautionary signal. When we initiated a VIX long in our tactical portfolio in October, it was one of the most glaring anomalies across markets and generated a 2.6x return when we took profits in this week’s panic.

The length of this correction will be determined by whether a ‘buy the dip’ mentality prevails among an influx of new Millennial investors evident in recent statements from online brokers like TD Ameritrade, as much as whether 10-yr yields will top out at 3% term. It’s unclear if some have been buying stocks on their credit cards, as they clearly were crypto coins in Q4 according to MasterCard’s latest results call (and watch for a spike in card delinquencies in Q2).

The rise in long-term US rates so far is less about Fed policy or inflation expectations as it is a looser fiscal stance. As highlighted in that December note, the supply of US bonds will rise sharply this year at the same moment that demand potentially ebbs as real economy demand for capital in Europe/EM rises. Meanwhile, the Fed will buy $420bn fewer Treasuries than it did in 2017 and in 2019 will reduce purchases by another $600bn. It certainly helps that the ECB and Bank of Japan will be buying nearly all local sovereign issuance and the jump in yields may encourage some active multi-asset managers to re-weight fixed income over equities, as well as the automatic risk-parity rebalancing.

Exposure to key secular themes such as autonomous vehicles/robots, the shift to ‘biological software’ in the drug industry etc. should be opportunistically accumulated into weakness. Earnings momentum globally remains strong;  the scale of guidance upgrades in Japan which has a dominant position in several emerging technology supply chains such as Lidar, vision sensors, monoclonal antibodies and EV batteries should offer support once markets settle. Meanwhile, active investors can take some comfort from the humiliation of the quants whose share of the market has risen to unhealthy and potentially destabilising levels.